March 23, 2017
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Fighting in dark
AUGUST 2014: The capability to detect and identify targets at night and under poor visibility conditions has been an essential military requirement for a long time. The modern armys need to operate at night and under conditions of extremely poor visibility has led in recent years to major advances in the development of night vision devices.
 
Correcting flaws
AUGUST 2014: For long, the cry was heard that the Indian Army was largely night blind or unable to fight a war in the dark. This was hardly an admission that any modern, self-respecting, fighting force should make. Yet, through
 
Digital nomads
AUGUST 2014: With the advent of nanotechnology in military warfare, it is no more a dream or a just science fiction where aliens invade Earth and return without getting injured despite heavy exchange of ground fire from best equipped soldiers having ultra decimated guns at their hands.
 
Robotic combat
AUGUST 2014: Conceived in 2007 the Indian unmanned strike air vehicle (USAV)-an attack version of the reconnaissance and surveillance and strike type of unmanned aerial vehicle that has had an impressive record of precision drone attacks
 
Rapid movement
JULY 2014: Difficult terrain in the early years of warfare (World War I and World War II) was that landscape that was serrated with trenches and cratered by the fall of heavy ball-type artillery which tended to obstruct passage of motor vehicles and towed and self-propelled guns thereby obstructing the momentum of the battlefield charge.
 
Digital combat
JULY 2014: NCW provides a level of situational awareness that allows the military to be more flexible, which increases mission effectiveness. However, it is clear that NCW is not by any means without flaws. A heavy reliance on technology is problematic, as it cannot be ruled out that technology may fail, may not be available at the time, or may be targeted by an enemy to reduce war-fighting capability.
 
Impregnable fort
JUNE 2014: In the age of ballistic missiles and supersonic fighters, the deployment of advance air intrusion warning systems have acquired greater relevance. Indian defence establishment is working on a plan to modernize country’s radar network to make its air space impregnable. But this is much behind the schedule.
 
Multilayered defence
JUNE 2014: The then Chief of Army Staff General V K Singh had warned almost three years ago that Indian Army’s air defence system has become obsolete. This was a startling admission coming from the Chief of Army Staff, who is generally not supposed to reveal such shortcomings openly on such sensitive issues relating to the actual position of the existing armaments.
 
Rotating vigil
JUNE 2014: Since Indias geopolitical interests are growing in the Indian Ocean region, an official estimate of just one aspect of military satellite requirement-for the Indian Navy in its Indian Ocean Region assignment-was placed at between 80 and 100 by Director General of Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) Dr Avinash Chander not very long ago.
 
Aerial supervision
JUNE 2014: Going by the speed of the induction one would never believe that Airborne Early Warning and Command Systems (AEW&CS) aircraft are a vital part of India’s air defence network. Because India was not getting them fast enough and in sufficient numbers it had to take resort to importing static aerostats that would plug the gaps in radar coverage of the Indian sub-continental periphery.